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The Sig Sauer Virtus AR Air Rifle

Sig Sauer Virtus Unboxing Review by American Airgunner

Sig Sauer’s highly anticipated AR platform air rifle is finally here and ready to rock and roll. The Sig Sauer Virtus rifle is based on their rock solid MCX platform to produce a reliable, dependable, and accurate air rifle for today’s air gunner. Unboxing the Virtus rifle, and putting it through its initial paces, American Airgunner has some key takeaways and first impressions of this fantastic new rifle.

Unboxing the Sig Sauer Virtus

Fit and Feel

First impressions can be critical, and the Virtus does not disappoint. This rifle is a Sig! Built with quality machining, perfect component fit, and the 7.5 pound weight of a quality firearm, it’s obvious from the start that the Virtus is a quality weapon. Balanced and ergonomic, the rifle feels good in the hand, is made to go to the shoulder, and is easy to aim.

Sig Sauer Virtus Specs

Sig paid attention to detail and built the Virtus with an abundance of standard options. 

  • PCP (Pre Charged Pneumatic)  This rifle operates from a high pressure (3,000 psi) regulated air tank. Offering around 200 shots per charge, and consistent pressure for accuracy, the MCX Virtus PCP doubles the muzzle energy from classic CO2 models. 
  • Caliber & Velocity  The Virtus is chambered in the popular .22 caliber, offering some flexibility with pellet weights and options. The Virtus is based on 11-12 ft/lb of energy, coupling the PCP regulator with pellet weight, and the muzzle velocity runs between 500 fps up to 700 fps depending on projectile weight.  
  • Sights and Accessories  Sig’s standard, rock solid, adjustable flip up sights come standard on the Virtus air rifle, and provide accurate target acquisition. M-Lok attachment points, and a top picatinny rail provide trigger forward access points for any variety of accessories, including optics, lasers, flashlights, bipods, and sling attachments. 
  • Rapid Pellet Magazine (RPM)  The RPM developed by Sig Sauer is a 30 round belt-fed pellet magazine, which is capable of delivering 30 rounds in 3.5 seconds. The RPM detachable mag has proven to be reliable and trouble free. 
  • Semi-Automatic Action  The Sig Virtus is built on Sig’s unfailing trigger group to operate the semi-auto action, providing the feel of a centerfire rifle with the convenience and versatility of an air rifle.

 

Putting the Sig Sauer Virtus Through Its Paces

  • Charging the PCP tank from zero pounds of pressure to 3,000 pounds took just under 5 minutes with a high pressure air compressor, allowing for up to 200 shots on a fully charged tank. 
  • The RPM magazine’s simple, yet robust, design makes it easy to load. The magazine locks into the rifle’s action solid and sturdy, and it’s ready to roll.  
  • Accuracy is quickly apparent when you put the Virtus to work. Balanced, quick to the target, and solid to the shoulder, the Virtus is a pleasure to shoot. Plinking one shot at a time, or rapid-fire semi-auto magazine dumps both provide reliable accuracy on target. 

 

Final Thoughts on the Sig Sauer Virtus Air Rifle

Sig Sauer has done a fantastic job creating an air rifle line that stands up to the Sig name. By developing the Virtus air rifle on the proven Sig MCX platform, the new air rifle offers tested performance and accuracy to the modern air gunner.  

The Virtus will really shine for anyone wanting to put in more time at the range, practice economical shooting discipline, or develop trigger finesse and dexterity. While it’s a practical rifle for the range, the Virtus could easily fill the niche of an awesome varmint rifle for camp or the ranch too. American Airgunner’s initial impressions of the Sig Sauer Virtus air rifle can be summed up as…impressive! 

American Aigunner TV 2019 Ep 3 | Shot Show 2019

Shot Show 2019

In this episode of American Airgunner, Rossi Morreale is visiting with some of his favorite brands at the 2019 Shot Show in Las Vegas, Nevada. Rossi begins the episode by visiting with Brocock checking out the all-new Commander Cerakote edition airgun.  This airgun comes with all the bells and whistles but can also be customized to your liking. Next up, we visit with Predator International to learn what they’ve been up to in the world of pellets.  Richard Dixon of Pellet International informs us of a resurgence in the .20 caliber airgun and their development of a 15 grain .20 caliber pellet. Scott Billingsley of Hawke Optics breaks down some changes to the Airmax and Frontier line of scopes. Rossi then visits with Scott Stevens and the Air Venturi booth where they discuss the new XDM and M1 carbine airguns that came out this spring. Also, breaking news for Seneca, they came out with a .25 caliber in the Aspen model. One of the biggest companies in airguns is Velocity Outdoors. Phillip Guadalupe of Velocity Outdoors speaks with Rossi about the Benjamin Mag-Fire model of airguns and the new models they came out with this year in that line of airguns. The Mag-Fire Mission, Mag-Fire Ultra, Mag-Fire Nomad are all new offerings in the Mag-Fire line.  Rossi wraps up the show by talking with Stephanie Kee of Sig Sauer to discuss all of their new offerings in the airsoft and airgun world. Lastly, Rossi couldn’t leave Las Vegas and Shot Show without heading to the range and enjoying some time with some of the coolest guns he may have seen the entire weekend.  Rossi ends the segment showcasing Sig Sauer’s PCP air rifle the MCX Vertus. We’ll see you next year Vegas!

Airgun Hunting 101 | Best Airguns, Pellets, Scopes, and Tips for Hunting

Top Tips for Airgun Hunting and Why It’s So Effective

If you are a hunter, there is a pretty good chance you grew up shooting some kind of BB gun or pellet gun behind the house before you took up more serious firearms. Maybe you simply used it for target practice, taking aim at an unfathomable number of soda cans and paper targets. But maybe you also hunted with it. Airguns have come a long way since then, and yet many people still overlook the value and efficiency of airgun hunting. The fact is that they can be very lethal when matched to the right purpose and hunting scenario. More states are making hunting with airguns legal for different species and there are new big bore airguns coming on the market all the time. In fact, there’s even a fair amount of airgun hunter recruitment coming in from those who bow hunt – that makes sense considering both options are quiet, require your target to be very close, and require a lot of skill and patience to accurately put the shot where it needs to be. If you’ve been dabbling with the idea of hunting with an air gun, here are some things to think about first.

Advantages of Airguns vs. Traditional Firearms

While there may be certain disadvantages with airgun hunting – such as shorter shot distances or having to re-pressurize after each shot – there are a few major advantages over traditional rimfire or centerfire rifles too that many people don’t think about.

  • First, airguns are much quieter than their gunpowder-powered counterparts. The sudden release of pressurized air still makes sound, make no mistake about it. Each brand, model, and caliber produces different sound levels. But it is generally a loud pop or “pssst” sound instead of a crack or bang often heard from a traditional rifle. Many game animals will stand in place after hearing a shot from an airgun as they try to figure out the source of the sound. This helps when trying to remove nuisance animals from your property.
  • Because they are quieter, you can also use some lower caliber airguns in many backyard settings without upsetting neighbors. This allows you to get some extra practice in throughout the week by popping a few shots off each night and not having to go to a shooting range.
  • Since there’s no powder being burned in airgun hunting, you don’t have to worry about all the chemical residue building up inside your gun, which makes cleaning a breeze.

Choosing an Airgun Caliber for Your Targeted Species

Once you’re convinced you’d like to try airgun hunting, you will need to decide on a specific gun and caliber. There are many more models available today than there used to be, including a wide range of calibers that are suitable for hunting many kinds of animals. From the smallest of varmint animals to some of the biggest mammals in North America, there is an airgun capable of quickly and ethically harvesting them. The best airgun caliber for hunting depends on the species being hunted and your own preferences. Check out the video and sections below for more information.

Small Bore Airguns

When we say small bore, we mean the smaller caliber guns that are useful for plinking or hunting small game animals. For example, you’re no doubt familiar with the .177 or .22 calibers when it comes to airgun hunting. But there’s also a .20 and .25 caliber airgun, which pretty much tops the small bore category.

Best Airgun Calibers for Small Game Hunting

Small game animals can vary widely by region, depending on what animals live there. But when it comes to airgun hunting, it generally includes rats, squirrels, rabbits, or birds. Just like traditional firearms, small bore airguns are more than capable of killing these animals provided you have enough practice and experience under your belt. For example, a .177 or .22 caliber air gun is plenty strong enough to hunt squirrels, rabbits, and many birds (e.g., grouse, crows, etc.). With proper shot placement on the head or vital chest area, you should have no problem hunting small game animals with an air gun. In fact, hunting rabbits with an air gun are easily accomplished with either, and you could push it to woodchuck-sized animals without much trouble. The biggest trick with small game air rifle hunting is getting close enough to make the shot. In a backyard setting, it’s usually easy to get within 20 yards of a rabbit or squirrel, but sneaking that close in a wild setting makes it much more likely the animal will bolt before you get the opportunity. Taking shots beyond 20-30 yards gets more difficult and will depend largely on how accurate your pellets are

Big Bore Airguns

Big bore airguns are obviously on the other end of the spectrum and can be used to hunt larger animals. Most people define the big bore calibers starting at the .30 caliber range, and then move on up the chain from there. For example, .308, .357, .45, and .50 caliber airguns are all available for hunting larger animals.

Best Airgun Calibers for Big Game Hunting

This is where most people get thrown off with air rifle hunting because nobody really expects you to be able to hunt a large animal (e.g., feral hogs, deer, bears, bison, etc.) with an airgun. But we’re not talking about using that same .22 caliber air rifle from above on a deer. We might be talking about a .50 caliber air rifle, which is more than enough to take down some really impressive animals, such as a bison! That sounds pretty exotic and intense, but hunters also routinely use an airgun for hunting deer or feral hogs if that sounds more attainable. With these higher powered calibers, there’s no hand pumping of the airgun. Instead, precharged pneumatic (PCP) rifles need to be pressurized with an air compressor before the hunt, and you might get a few shots from them before you need to recharge them. Depending on what big game animal you want to hunt and your own personal preferences, the caliber might change a bit. Each state may have different laws and regulations that dictate which caliber you can use as a minimum on big game species. Overall, the .45 family of airgun ammunition is commonly used on many big game species. But the .50 caliber can be deadly even up to American bison!

Predator Hunting Airgun Calibers

In between the small bore and big bore options, there’s a little variability depending on who you talk to. Some experts believe the .25 and .30 caliber options are a good mid-range option that can be used on predators or for varmint hunting. For example, the .357 is a popular choice for predator (e.g., coyote, bobcat, etc.) or varmint (e.g., woodchuck, raccoons, prairie dogs, etc.) hunts.

Best Airgun Ammo for Hunting

Probably just as important as the caliber discussion, your choice of ammunition for an airgun is critical to making the best, most lethal shot possible. There are a couple of different types of projectile types available on the market today. Each one has its own specific best use and may not be suitable for all or any airgun hunting.

Shapes of Airgun Pellets/Ammo

For the basic small bore airguns (e.g., .177, .20, .22, and .25 caliber), you will find roughly four types or shapes of airgun ammunition. The best pellet for small game hunting is the domed/round nose pellet, which is accurate out of most airguns. But each airgun tends to shoot more or less accurate depending on the type and brand of pellets, so take time to shoot a variety and find the best option.

  • Domed/round nose
  • Pointed
  • Flat pellets/wadcutters
  • Hollow points

In addition to these ammunition shapes, there is big bore airgun ammunition as well. Hollow points tend to not be necessary given the ballistics of higher calibers, but they do also cut cleaner wound channels. Heavier ammunition is generally only used by precharged pneumatic airguns. Round ball ammunition will get better penetration on larger animals, but they tend to be less accurate than cast bullets because they don’t fly as efficiently.

  • Round ball
  • Cast bullet
  • Hollow points

Small Game Ammunition

Ammunition used for small game airgun hunting is almost universally a pellet with one of the four shapes mentioned above (i.e., domed/round nose, pointed, flat pellets/wadcutters, and hollow points). These airgun pellets tend to fly very fast and very accurately, which also allows them to shoot flat trajectories. However, they slow down faster as the distance increases. Because they slow down faster, they are less likely to do damage if they miss their mark, which makes them great for use in suburban areas.

Big Game Ammunition

On the other hand, big game animals require a different approach. Round balls or cast bullets are better options for larger animals. Round balls and cast bullets both keep their velocity better than pellets, which makes them a better choice for big game hunts.

Best Airguns for Hunting

Everyone has their own personal preferences when it comes to any firearm, including airguns. But there are a few choices that we have tested and that you should love too.

Airgun Hunting Gear

Of course, with any kind of hunting, you will need specific gear to go along with your new airgun hunting obsession. Here are some things to keep in mind before you start buying anything, and a few things to remember afterward too.

8 Things You’ll Need Before Airgun Hunting

Below is a list of the basic gear you will need to go hunting with an airgun, particularly if you are using a big bore gun for larger animals.

  • Multi-shot airgun to allow for follow-up shots at game animals.
  • The power source (for air compressors) or removable air source for a high shot count when shooting a PCP airgun.
  • Pouch or carrying case for transporting pellets or bullets in the field.
  • Sighting devices (e.g., laser rangefinder and/or scope).
  • Manometer (i.e., air pressure gauge) to monitor the amount of air that is in your PCP gun.
  • Accessory rails or mounts to add lights for night hunting (generally only for predator, varmint, or hog hunting).
  • Swivel studs and a sling or carrying the gun in a scabbard are both good options to carry your airgun in the field.
  • A shrouded barrel or suppressor to silence the sound will help you while hunting.

Airgun Scopes

Because airgun hunting requires you to be so precise and accurate, using a scope is almost a necessity in many cases. As your prey animals gets smaller, more dangerous, or further away, you need to make absolutely sure you can put the bullet or pellet where it needs to be. You get what you pay for with scopes. Larger scopes with bigger objective lenses and better quality coatings will perform much better than cheaper options. Illuminated reticles provide some nice contrast for low light situations. Variable power scopes provide some leeway if you want to adjust in the field, but many people tend to use higher magnifications than they need.

Rossi’s Recommended Airgun Scopes

Leveling and Sighting in an Airgun Scope

When you get a new scoped airgun and want to learn to shoot it accurately, some people get intimidated. When first mounting the airgun (or rifle), you want to make sure that the reticle (crosshairs) look level to you. It’s different for everyone.

As you sight in your airgun, pick a reasonable range (e.g., 30 yards) that you will do a lot of your shooting and hunting at. For variable power scopes, turn it all the way up to maximum magnification. Take a shot and see where you hit the target. Then adjust the windage and elevation turrets on your scope until you start to shoot the bullseye. Afterward, you can dial the magnification down again to what you think is reasonable, and it should keep its zero.

Critical Airgun Hunting Tips And Useful Knowledge  

When it comes to how to hunt with airguns, you need to understand a few important things that usually aren’t quite intuitive.

Airgun Energy

Most new airgunners don’t know what airgun energy is or how it helps. The energy of an airgun is measured in foot-pounds, which is the energy needed to move one pound one foot of distance. What that means for the average airgun hunter is that heavier and faster projectiles do more damage than lighter and slower projectiles. Having higher overall energy (foot pounds) means you can take larger animals or put them down faster. A big bore gun will deliver much more power/foot pounds than small bore guns, even if they are capable of shooting at similar velocities (feet per second). There are calculators to help you determine that energy.

Airgun Hunting Shot Placement

As mentioned earlier, airgun hunters need to deliver their shots exactly where they intend to. This is because airguns don’t offer the same foot pounds/energy (and therefore trauma) that firearms are capable of doing. Therefore, the pellet or bullet needs to hit the vital organs every time with enough energy to kill them quickly. For small game animals or predators/varmint animals, headshots are good options because they offer about the same size target as a body cavity shot, but they are extremely deadly and will generally drop an animal in its tracks. This is important when hunting in suburban areas or places where you don’t want the animal to run a long distance before dying. For big game animals, a broadside heart and lung shot is the ultimate goal because it should avoid hitting the significant bone structure and will quickly kill an animal.

Shooting Distance

Airgunners keep pushing the capabilities of airguns as they practice long range shooting. Depending on the gun you use, long-range might mean very different things – but anything past 75-100 yards is generally a good distance. You will need to consider the overall velocities of your airgun and how your ammunition maintains its energy. But a .308 is a good caliber choice for long distance target shooting.

If you haven’t thought seriously about going airgun hunting before, hopefully, this has changed your mind. Modern air rifles are very sophisticated and powerful when used correctly. And they’re a lot of fun to shoot too!

 

Pyramyd Air Cup

The Pyramyd Air Cup Competition

If you’re into shooting airguns the 2019 Pyramyd Air Cup is a weekend you want to be part of! Throughout the weekend there are multiple competitions, great people, great food, and lots of FUN! The 2019 Pyramyd Air Cup will be held August 23-25, 2019 at Cardinal Shooting Center in Marengo, Ohio. The biggest East Coast Airgun Competition just got a whole lot better.  This year they’ll be bringing back the fan favorites – Field Target and Gunslynger competitions, but adding a Benchrest Competition to up the excitement.  Plus, it’s new home at Cardinal Shooting Center in Marengo, Ohio is a top-notch facility that will provide a great backdrop to a great weekend.  Don’t delay – spots are limited – enter today! The competition, camaraderie, and fun are for everybody, come and join us! You can register by following this link… https://www.pyramydair.com/PACUP

Enjoy videos from Air Cup Competitions Past!!

 

Air Rifle Field Target at Pyramyd Air Cup

Pyramyd Air Cup Air Rifle Shooting Competition: Part 1

Pyramyd Air Cup Shooting Competition Part 2

Airgun Hunting Rat Wars 2018

Hunting Rats with an Airgun | Rat Wars 2018

On this episode of American Airgunner, Rossi joins the war on pest control and competes in the 2018 Air Gun Rat Wars.  The 2-day competition was comprised of 4 teams, Innnerloc’s Out There, Urban Nocks, Umarex Airguns, and American Airgunner. Teams were scored on the heaviest rat, longest rat, heaviest total catch, nest treasure, and most rats.  Each team had 2 shooters and a guide that were equipped with Umarex Gauntlet air guns and Axeon Laser Scopes. The guns have been dialed in from 10ft to 30ft for those hard to reach rats.

This is the 3rd annual competition that was initiated to bring an element of fun to handle a nuisance population of rats that decimate farmers feed and machinery. Join Rossi and his crew as they set to reduce the rat population and have a few laughs.

Check Out The Gauntlet Here

 

Rossi’s Airgun Reviews | Airforce Model 94

AirForce International Model 94 Airgun Review

On the latest installment of Rossi’s Reviews, Rossi’s taken a look at a line of air guns that he’s completely unfamiliar with. The AirForce International line of guns are mainly break barrel actions that are manufactured in Spain. The model Rossi reviewed is the AirForce International 94 Spring Air Rifle break barrel single shot in a .22 caliber topped with an AirForce 4×32 scope. One characteristic that separates AirForce International from other manufacturers is the ability to customize your rifle to your liking whether that’s by changing the stock or swapping out the barrel for a different caliber.   Make sure to watch the entire video we promise you won’t be disappointed with this guns versatility and performance!

 

 AirForce International 94 Spring Air Rifle

  • .177, .22, and .25 caliber offerings
  • Break barrel
  • Single-shot
  • Precision, hammer forged, rifled steel barrel
  • Integral muzzle brake
  • 11mm dovetail optics rail
  • Two stage adjustable trigger
  • Fixed TruGlo fiber optic front sight (red, 0.060″)
  • Fully adjustable TruGlo fiber optic rear sight (green, 0.035″)
  • Anti-bear trap mechanism
  • Automatic safety
  • Synthetic stock
  • Rubber butt pad
  • Raised cheek piece
  • Weight: 7.5 lbs.
  • Overall length: 44.9″
  • Barrel length: 18.75″

https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/AirForce_International_94_Spring_Air_Rifle/3613

https://www.pyramydair.com/s/m/AirForce_International_Orion_Air_Rifle/3616

All About Air Gun Scopes

Rossi Morreale and air gun experts Tom Gaylord the Godfather of Airguns, Jim Chapman the American Airgun Hunter and Tyler Patner from Pyramyd Air all talk “how to” about Scope Adjustments when shooting air rifles in this information-packed round table originally seen on Pursuit Channel. American Airgunner and its host and guests brings the forums to life. Did you know that scopes were not always adjustable? How to sight in a scope? How to select a scope? Watch all the way to the end. Lots of information for new and experienced shooters on the confusing topic of optics.

Need an optic for your airgun? Buy now at Pyramyd Airgun Scopes.

Absolute Zero

Crazy Easy Air Rifle Scope Sight In

Absolute ZeroYou have to check out this new device, the Absolute Zero. It’s a precision sight-in instrument that uses two lasers to form a triangulation with the laser and point of impact. It makes sighting in your rifle real easy. Using two precision lasers it guarantees you hold your rifle in the exact same place for each shot completely eliminating hold error. Basically, you just have to worry about making sure your position is the same each time. It’s the quickest, most efficient, most accurate way to find your zero at 25 yards giving you the ability to sight in your rifle at 100 yards in just two more shots. The Absolute Zero™ saves you time.

http://www.axeonoptics.com

Plain and Simple – Steve Criner Podcast

Check out Steve Criner’s latest Podcast!